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Kubernetes 1.24: The Most Important Changes and What They Mean for You

11 Steps to Migrate Your Applications to Kubernetes

Kubernetes 1.24 is the first release of 2022 and it comes with a lot of important changes. In this blog post, we will discuss the most important ones and how they matter for your business. Kubernetes is an open-source platform that enables you to manage containerized applications. It has gained a lot of popularity in recent years, and for good reason – it can help businesses save time and money. With Kubernetes 1.24, there are some great new features that businesses should take advantage of!

11 Steps to Migrate Your Applications to Kubernetes

Kubernetes 1.24 is the first release of 2022 and it comes with a lot of important changes. In this blog post, we will discuss the most important ones and how they matter for your business. Kubernetes is an open-source platform that enables you to manage containerized applications. It has gained a lot of popularity in recent years, and for good reason – it can help businesses save time and money. With Kubernetes 1.24, there are some great new features that businesses should take advantage of!

May 11, 2022

Author by surajg

 

Dockershim is now entirely removed

One of the most significant changes in Kubernetes v.24 is the removal of Dockershim. Dockershim was a compatibility layer that allowed users to run Kubernetes with Docker containers. However, it was deprecated in Kubernetes v.23 and is now entirely removed in v.24. This means that businesses must now use a different container runtime if they want to use Kubernetes.

There are many reasons why the removal of Dockershim is a good thing. First, it simplifies the Kubernetes codebase and makes it easier to maintain. Second, it removes an unnecessary abstraction layer that can cause performance issues. And third, it allows businesses to take advantage of newer container runtimes that offer better performance and security.

If your business is currently using Dockershim, you will need to migrate to a different container runtime before upgrading to Kubernetes v.24. This can be a daunting task, but there are many resources available to help you make the transition. The Kubernetes community is always happy to help, so don’t hesitate to reach out if you need assistance.

Kubernetes v.24 also includes a number of other changes that businesses should be aware of. We’ve listed a few of the most important ones below:

– The `kubelet` now requires all containers to be run with a read-only root filesystem.

– The `kube-proxy` has been replaced with the `kube-router` as the default network proxy.

– The `dashboard` add-on has been deprecated and will be removed in a future release.

New kubelet metric: OOM events

One of the most important changes in Kubernetes version is the addition of a new metric to track OOM events. As any cluster administrator knows, out-of-memory (OOM) conditions can be extremely difficult to diagnose. By tracking the number of OOM events that occur on a node, we can now get a better sense of which nodes are most vulnerable to memory pressure.

This change is especially important for operators of large Kubernetes clusters, as it will help them identify problem nodes before they cause major outages. For more information on this change, check out the Kubernetes documentation.

Choose the type of LoadBalancer you want

In Kubernetes this version `$ kubectl version` you can now specify the type of LoadBalancer you want. By default, it will create a public LoadBalancer. If you want to create an internal LoadBalancer, specify the `–type=internal` flag.

If you have an existing LoadBalancer, you can update it to be internal by running `kubectl patch svc`. For example:

kubectl patch svc my-service -p ‘{“spec”:{“type”:”internal”}}’

This change will likely be most useful for users who want to have greater control over their LoadBalancer settings and who want to avoid creating public endpoints for their services.

As of Kubernetes v.0.18, the `Service` resource supports three different types of LoadBalancers:

– ExternalIPs

– NodePort

– LoadBalancer

In Kubernetes v.0.21, the `Service` resource added a new field called `LoadBalancerIP`. This field allows you to specify the IP address of your LoadBalancer. If you do not specify a `LoadBalancerIP`, Kubernetes will automatically assign one for you.

However, as of Kubernetes v.0.24, the `Service` resource has deprecated the `LoadBalancerIP` field. This means that you can no longer specify the IP address of your LoadBalancer in the `Service` resource. Instead, you must specify it in the `Endpoints` resource.

The Service.Spec.LoadBalancerIP field is deprecate

The Service.Spec.LoadBalancerIP field has been deprecated in Kubernetes v0.21 and will be removed in a future version. If you are using this field, we recommend that you migrate to the new Service.Spec.LoadBalancerSourceRanges field.

The LoadBalancerIP field has been deprecated because it is no longer necessary with the introduction of the new Service.Spec.LoadBalancerSourceRanges field in Kubernetes v0.21 . The LoadBalancerSourceRanges field allows you to specify a list of CIDRs from which your load balancer will accept traffic. This replaces the need for the LoadBalancerIP field, which only allowed you to specify a single CIDR.

If you are currently using the LoadBalancerIP field, we recommend that you migrate to the new LoadBalancerSourceRanges field. TheLoadBalancerSourceRanges field is more flexible and will allow you to specify a list of CIDRs from which your load balancer will accept traffic.

To migrate to the new LoadBalancerSourceRanges field, you will need to update your Service resource definition to include the new field. You can then remove the LoadBalancerIP field from your Service resource definition.

We hope that this blog post has helped you understand the changes in Kubernetes v0.21 and how they affect the Service.Spec.LoadBalancerIP field.

No Secret by default for service account tokens

As of Kubernetes version `v0.17`, all service accounts are automatically given a secret by default. This secret is used to access the API and perform actions on behalf of the service account. However, starting in Kubernetes `v0.18`, this is no longer the case and service account tokens are not secrets by default.

This change may not seem like a big deal, but it’s actually a very important security measure. By making service account tokens non-secret by default, it means that they can’t be accidentally leaked or exposed. It also means that if a service account token is compromised, it can be easily revoked without affecting other parts of the cluster.

So, what does this change mean for you? If you’re using Kubernetes `v0.18` or higher, make sure that your service account tokens are not stored in secrets. Instead, store them in a safe and secure location where they can’t be accidentally exposed.

The RuntimeClass.Overhead field is now GA

Kubernetes has long been able to schedule containers with different resource requirements on the same host. This is useful, for example, when you want to run a database container that requires more CPU than your average application container. In order to make this work, Kubernetes needs to be able to “double book ” CPU resources, and schedule two containers on the same host if they have different CPU requirements.

The RuntimeClass object was introduced in Kubernetes v11 to allow administrators to configure which containers can be scheduled together, and how much CPU overhead each container type requires. In Kubernetes v12, the RuntimeClass.Overhead field was added to allow administrators to specify the amount of CPU overhead that a container requires.

The RuntimeClass.Overhead field is now GA in Kubernetes v13, and provides a more fine-grained way to control CPU scheduling on your cluster. If you have applications that require different amounts of CPU overhead, you can now specify the amount of overhead required for each application, and Kubernetes will schedule them accordingly.

This change is backwards-compatible, and does not require any changes to your existing applications or containers. If you are using the RuntimeClass object in your cluster, you can continue to use it without any changes.

If you have applications that require different amounts of CPU overhead, you can now specify the amount of overhead required for each application, and Kubernetes will schedule them accordingly. This change is backwards-compatible, and does not require any changes to your existing applications or containers. If you are using the RuntimeClass object in your cluster, you can continue to use it without any changes.

The RuntimeClass.Overhead field is a great addition to Kubernetes, and provides more fine-grained control over CPU scheduling on your cluster. If you have applications that require different amounts of CPU overhead, you can now specify the amount of overhead required for each application, and Kubernetes will schedule them accordingly. This change is backwards-compatible, and does not require any changes to your existing applications or containers. If you are using the RuntimeClass object in your cluster, you can continue to use it without any changes.

Future Beta APIs will be off by default

As of Kubernetes version `v.`Future Beta APIs will be off by default in Kubernetes. This means that any new features added in future beta versions of Kubernetes will not be enabled by default. You can enable them by explicitly setting the `api-server` and/or `controller-manager` to use the beta feature flags.

The rationale for this change is that it allows the Kubernetes community to iterate on new features faster, without having to wait for them to graduate to stable status. It also reduces the support burden on early adopters of new features, who often have to help debug issues that might only affect a small number of users.

If you’re interested in trying out new Kubernetes features as they become available, you can opt in to using beta APIs by setting the `–feature-gates` flag when starting the API server and/or controller manager. For example:

“`

$ api-server –feature-gates=SomeNewFeature=true,AnotherNewFeature=true …

$ controller-manager –feature-gates=SomeNewFeature=true,AnotherNewFeature=true …

“`

To get a full list of feature gates that are available in Kubernetes, run `kubelet –help`. Feature gates that are enabled by default are not listed. Note that some features gate other features; for example, `SomeNewFeature` might gate `AnotherNewFeature`.

Conclusion:

That’s all for now, but we wanted to give you a quick heads up on some upcoming changes. Dockershim is removed sfrom Kubernetes in the next release and changing how kubelet metrics are reported. The Service.Spec.LoadBalancerIP field is deprecated, so make sure to use the new LoadBalancer type fields instead. And finally, starting with 1.10 beta APIs will be off by default – if you want to use them, you’ll need to explicitly enable them using the –beta-apis flag. If there’s anything else we can help with or answer your questions about, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

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