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AWS DevSecOps CI/CD Pipeline: How to Build a Secure End-to-End Pipeline with Open Source Tools

AWS DevSecOps CI/CD Pipeline: How to Build a Secure End-to-End Pipeline with Open Source Tools

In today’s world, security is of utmost importance. This is especially true when it comes to applications and software. As more and more businesses move to the cloud, the need for secure DevOps pipelines has become increasingly important. In this blog post, we will discuss how to build a secure end-to-end pipeline with open source tools. We will be using SCA, SAST and DAST tools to help us achieve our goal. Let’s get started!

AWS DevSecOps CI/CD Pipeline: How to Build a Secure End-to-End Pipeline with Open Source Tools

In today’s world, security is of utmost importance. This is especially true when it comes to applications and software. As more and more businesses move to the cloud, the need for secure DevOps pipelines has become increasingly important. In this blog post, we will discuss how to build a secure end-to-end pipeline with open source tools. We will be using SCA, SAST and DAST tools to help us achieve our goal. Let’s get started!

Apr 09, 2022

Author by surajg

 

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Services and tools

In order to build a secure DevOps pipeline, we need to use the right tools. In this section, we will discuss some of the open source tools that we can use.

SCA: SCA is a tool that helps us find security vulnerabilities in our code. It does this by scanning our code and looking for known security vulnerabilities.

SAST: SAST is a tool that helps us find security vulnerabilities in our code. It does this by analyzing our code and looking for potential security issues.

DAST: DAST is a tool that helps us find security vulnerabilities in our applications. It does this by scanning our application and looking for known security vulnerabilities.

These are just some of the tools that we can use to build a secure DevOps pipeline. In the next section, we will discuss how to use these tools to achieve our goal.

SCA: SCA is a tool that helps us find security vulnerabilities in our code. It does this by scanning our code and looking for known security vulnerabilities.

SAST: SAST is a tool that helps us find security vulnerabilities in our code. It does this by analyzing our code and looking for potential security issues.

DAST: DAST is a tool that helps us find security vulnerabilities in our applications. It does this by scanning our application and looking for known security vulnerabilities.

These are just some of the tools that we can use to build a secure DevOps pipeline. In the next section, we will discuss how to use these tools to achieve our goal.

CI/CD services

Continuous integration (CI) is the practice of automating the build and testing of code every time a developer commits changes to version control. Continuous delivery (CD) takes it one step further by automating the release process so that new code can be deployed to production as soon as it passes all tests.

A typical CI/CD pipeline will include several stages, such as development, testing, staging, and production. Each stage will have its own set of requirements and approval processes. For example, you might want to run more thorough tests on code before it is deployed to production.

To help you get started with building a secure CI/CD pipeline on AWS, we have put together a blog post that outlines how to use open source tools to automate the build, testing, and deployment of your code.

Read on to learn how to set up a CI/CD pipeline that will help you deliver code changes faster and with fewer errors.

When it comes to building a CI/CD pipeline, there are many options available. However, not all of these options are created equal. In order to build a secure end-to-end pipeline, you need to use tools that offer robust security features.

AWS CodePipeline is a fully managed continuous delivery service that helps you automate your release pipelines. CodePipeline builds, tests, and deploys your code every time there is a change, making it easy for you to rapidly release new features.

AWS CodeBuild is a fully managed continuous integration service that compiles source code, runs tests, and produces software packages that are ready for deployment.

AWS CodeCommit is a fully managed version control service that makes it easy for you to host and manage your Git repositories.

In addition to these AWS services, you will also need to use open source tools for security testing. These tools can help you find potential security vulnerabilities in your code so that you can fix them before they are exploited.

 

One of the most popular open source security testing tools is OWASP ZAP (Zed Attack Proxy). ZAP is an intercepting proxy that can be used for security testing of web applications. It can be used to automatically find vulnerabilities in your web applications.

Another popular open source tool is Brakeman. Brakeman is a static analysis tool that scans Ruby on Rails applications for security vulnerabilities.

To learn more about how to use these tools to build a secure CI/CD pipeline, check out our blog post: AWS DevSecOps CI/CD Pipeline: How to Build a Secure End-to-End Pipeline with Open Source Tools. In this post, we will show you how to use AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS CodeCommit to automate the build, testing, and deployment of your code. We will also show you how to use open source security testing tools to find potential security vulnerabilities in your code.

Continuous testing tools

As your code changes, it is important to ensure that those changes do not break existing functionality. This is where continuous testing comes in. Continuous testing is the practice of automating the execution of tests so that they can be run frequently, at each stage of the software development cycle.

There are many different tools available for continuous testing. Some of these tools are open source, while others are commercial.

One popular open source tool is Jenkins. Jenkins is a self-contained, open source automation server that can be used to automate all aspects of your build process. It can be used to run tests, deploy code changes, and generate reports.

Another popular tool is Selenium. Selenium is a web application testing framework that can be used to automate the testing of web applications. Selenium can be used to test both the front-end and back-end of web applications.

Continuous logging and monitoring services

A key AWS service is Amazon CloudWatch, which monitors your AWS resources and applications in real time. By default, AWS CloudWatch Logs will collect all log events from an AWS Lambda function and write them to a centralised log group. You can then create metric filters and alarms on these logs to trigger notifications or take action based on specific conditions.

To get started with AWS CloudWatch Logs, you first need to create a log group and specify the name of your Lambda function. Next, you need to create a metric filter that matches the log events that you want to monitor. Finally, you need to create an alarm that specifies the conditions under which you want to be notified or take action.

In addition to AWS CloudWatch Logs, you can also use Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS) to monitor your AWS resources and applications. Amazon SNS is a fully managed pub/sub messaging service that makes it easy to decouple and scale microservices, distributed systems, and serverless applications.

To get started with Amazon SNS, you first need to create a topic and specify the name of your AWS Lambda function. Next, you need to subscribe to the topic. Finally, you need to configure the Amazon SNS message delivery policy for your AWS Lambda function.

To sum up, continuous logging and monitoring services are key AWS services that can help you monitor your AWS resources and applications in real time. By using AWS CloudWatch Logs and Amazon Simple Notification Service, you can set up a secure end-to-end pipeline with open source tools. Thanks for reading! We hope this has been helpful. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave them below.Until next time!

In this blog post, we will show you how to build a secure end-to-end pipeline with open source tools on AWS. We will cover the following topics:

– Continuous Integration and Delivery services in AWS

– Continuous monitoring and logging services in AWS

– Setting up a secure end-to-end pipeline with open source tools on AWS

If you are new to AWS or DevOps, we recommend that you check out our previous blog post on AWS DevOps before continuing. In that blog post, we give an overview of AWS and DevOps and cover the following topics:

– What is AWS?

– What is DevOps?

– Why do you need both AWS and DevOps?

Now that we have a basic understanding of AWS and DevOps, let’s dive into how to build a secure end-to-end pipeline with open source tools on AWS.

As organizations move towards continuous delivery and continuous deployment, it is important to have a robust CI/CD pipeline in place. A CI/CD pipeline helps developers automate the process of code development, testing, and deployment.

There are many different CI/CD tools available, both open source and commercial. In this blog post, we will focus on using open source tools to build a secure end-to-end pipeline on AWS. We will use the following open source tools:

– Jenkins

– AWS CodePipeline

– AWS CodeBuild

– AWS CodeDeploy

Let’s start by taking a look at each of these tools in more detail.

Jenkins is an open source automation server that enables developers to continuously integrate and deliver code changes. It can be used to automate various tasks such as building, testing, and deploying code changes.

Auditing and governance services

In a DevSecOps pipeline, auditing and governance are critical to ensure that the application is secure end-to-end. AWS provides several services to help with this, including AWS Config, AWS CloudTrail, and Amazon GuardDuty. In this post, we’ll take a look at how to use these services to build a secure end-to-end pipeline with open source tools.

AWS Config is a service that allows you to audit your AWS resources and their configurations. With AWS Config, you can track changes to your resources over time and monitor compliance against your own internal policies. You can also use AWS Config rules to automate the of security best practices across your AWS environment. AWS CloudTrail is a service that allows you to log all AWS API calls made in your AWS account. This can be useful for auditing purposes, as well as for tracking who made what changes to your AWS resources. Amazon GuardDuty is a security monitoring service that can help you detect and respond to malicious or unauthorized activity in your AWS account. GuardDuty analyzes AWS CloudTrail logs and VPC Flow Logs to identify suspicious activity, such as unusual API calls or unexpected network traffic. By using these services together, you can build a secure end-to-end pipeline that helps you audit and govern your AWS environment.

To get started, you’ll need to create an AWS Config rule and an Amazon GuardDuty detector. AWS Config rules can be created using the AWS Management Console, AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), or AWS SDKs. To create an Amazon GuardDuty detector, you’ll need to use the AWS CLI.

First, let’s create an AWS Config rule. We’ll call our rule “SecurityGroupRule”. This rule will check for security groups that allow ingress from 0.0.0.0/0 (anywhere). To do this, we’ll use the “CheckDiscoveredResources” permission set and specify the resource type as “AWS::ECSECurity::Group”. Next, we’ll add a condition to our rule that checks if the ingress rule allows port 22 (SSH) from anywhere. We’ll do this by adding a “StringEquals” condition with the following values:

 

– SourceIpAddress : 0.0.0.0/0

– FromPort : 22

– ToPort : 22

– Protocol : tcp

If the ingress rule allows port 22 from anywhere, AWS Config will trigger an AWS Lambda function that will send a notification to Amazon SNS. Amazon SNS is a pub/sub messaging service that can be used to send notifications about AWS Config rules. In our Lambda function, we’ll specify the Amazon SNS topic ARN and the message to be sent in the notification. The message will include information about the security group and ingress rule that violated the AWS Config rule.

Now that we have our AWS Config rule set up, let’s create an Amazon GuardDuty detector. To do this, we’ll use the “create-detector” command:

aws guardduty create-detector \

–profile adminuser \

–region us-east-l \

–cli-input-json file://SecurityGroupDetector.json

The JSON file included in the command contains the following information:

{

“Enable”: true,

“FindingPublishingFrequency”: “SUBNET_MONTHLY”, // can be FIFTEEN_MINUTES | ONE_HOUR | SIX_HOURS | TWELVE_HOURS | DAILY | WEEKLY

“Tags”: {

“Key”: “Value”

},

}

This will create a GuardDuty detector in our AWS account. Once the detector is created, we’ll need to add our AWS Config rule as a data source. To do this, we’ll use the “add-members” command:

aws guardduty add-members \

–profile adminuser \

–region us-east-l \

–detector-id 0123456789012 \ // replace with your DetectorId

–account-ids 0123456789012 \ // replace with your AWS Account Ids (comma separated) –member-ship-type AWS_CONFIG

This will add AWS Config as a data source for our GuardDuty detector. Now, whenever an AWS Config rule is violated, we’ll receive a notification from Amazon SNS. We can use this notification to investigate the violation and take appropriate action.

By using AWS Config and Amazon GuardDuty together, you can build a secure end-to-end pipeline that helps you audit and govern your AWS environment. By using these services together, you can build a secure end-to-end pipeline that helps you audit and govern your AWS environment.

Next, let’s talk about auditing your AWS resources with CloudTrail logs. CloudTrail is a service allows you to log all AWS API calls made in your AWS account. These logs can be used to track changes made to AWS resources, identify suspicious activity, and troubleshoot issues. To get started, you’ll need to create a CloudTrail trail. A CloudTrail trail is a configuration that specifies the location of your CloudTrail logs and the events that should be logged. You can create a CloudTrail trail using the AWS Management Console, AWS CLI, or AWS SDKs.

Once you’ve created your CloudTrail trail, you’ll need to specify a log group in Amazon CloudWatch Logs. A log group is a collection of logs with similar characteristics.

Operations services

– AWS OpsWorks for Chef Automate: A fully managed AWS Opsworks service that makes it easy to set up and operate your Chef server.

– AWS CloudFormation: We provide templates and blueprints to AWS Opsworks so that you can easily provision and manage AWS resources.

Pipeline Architecture

we’ll take a deep dive into the pipeline architecture that you can use to build a secure end-to-end AWS DevSecOps CI/CD pipeline with open source tools. We’ll also provide some tips on how to get started with building your own pipeline.

The AWS DevSecOps CI/CD pipeline is a continuous delivery pipeline that automates the build, test, and deploy phases of your software development life cycle (SDLC). The AWS DevSecOps CI/CD pipeline can be used to automatically build, test, and deploy AWS Lambda functions. The AWS Lambda function will then run your code in response to events generated by AWS services such as Amazon SNS.

The AWS DevSecOps CI/CD pipeline can be used to automatically build, test, and deploy AWS Lambda functions in response to events generated by AWS services such as Amazon SNS. The AWS Lambda function will then run your code.

Prerequisites

If you want to build an AWS DevSecOps CI/CD Pipeline, there are a few things you’ll need:

– An AWS account. If you don’t have one yet, you can create one for free here.

– A domain name. You can either use a Domain Name System (DNS) provider like Amazon Route 53 or a free service like AWS Route 53.

– A text editor. We recommend using Visual Studio Code, which is free and available for download here.

– The AWS Command Line Interface (CLI). This is a tool that allows you to interact with AWS from the command line. You can install it here.

– The AWS CloudFormation template. This is a template that will create all of the resources necessary for your pipeline. You can find it here.

Once you have all of these prerequisites, you’re ready to begin building your AWS DevSecOps CI/CD Pipeline!

Deploying the pipeline

The first step is to create an AWS account and set up a user with programmatic access. Then install the AWS CLI tool on your workstation. You will also need to create an SNS topic and subscribe to it in order to receive notifications from AWS CodePipeline.

Next, you need to create a new IAM role for AWS CodePipeline. This role will be used by the service to perform actions on your behalf. The role should have the following policies attached: AmazonSNSFullAccess, AWSCodePipelineCustomActionAccess, and AmazonECSTaskExecutionRolePolicy.

Now you are ready to deploy the pipeline using AWS CloudFormation. Create a new stack using the AWS CloudFormation template provided in the AWS CodePipeline sample code repository.

Once the stack has been created, you can view the pipeline in the AWS CodePipeline console. The pipeline should have three stages: Source, Build, and Deploy.

Conclusion:

As you can see, there are many different services and tools that can help you with your continuous integration/continuous deployment (CI/CD) pipeline. While the prerequisites and steps for setting up a pipeline vary depending on your specific environment and needs, we hope this article has given you a good overview of what’s involved. If you have any questions or need help getting started, don’t hesitate to contact us. Our team of experts would be happy to assist you in deploying a secure and effective CI/CD pipeline.

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